5 Steps You Can Take To Fight Racism & Fascism In Your Community

New Syndicalist

The below article comes to us from Nick, a digital organiser for HOPE not hate, an anti-racist and anti-fascist advocacy group on 5 simple steps you can take to fight racism & fascism in your community. Often it seems that populism is tied to racist or fascist elements, and even left populism can take thinly (or not so thinly) veiled nationalist or anti-semitic overtones. An analysis of populism, and it’s utility to organisers and socialists has to deal with this, and propose ways to defuse this where necessary. We welcome contributions from the wider anti-racist & anti-fascist movement focused on their relationship with trade unionism and working class organising, as well as updated analysis of the far right and suggestions for innovative and effective ways our readers can get involved.

It’s early 2019, and we’ve already witnessed Members of Parliament and the media being harassed and abused on the streets…

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Rossum’s Universal Robots by Karel Čapek, Epilogue

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-2qxhm-bd7759

Recorded by librivox.org

Helena Glory, as the daughter of a major industrial power’s president, is a woman on a mission. She faces the island factory of Rossum’s Universal Robots, the world’s leading company in robotic engineering. She is convinced that these new creations called robots they make are deserving of rights like humans do. Everyone else is convinced robots are nothing more than tools for human use. Is it so, or is a robot rebellion becoming a more likely prospect as the robots start to seem more intelligent than first thought?
First performed in English in 1922, R.U.R. is most notable for being the play that introduced the word “robot” into the English language and one of the popular early examples of the science fiction genre onstage. (Mary Kay)

Rossum’s Universal Robots by Karel Čapek, act 3

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-fhgdt-bd774f

Recorded by Librivox.org

Helena Glory, as the daughter of a major industrial power’s president, is a woman on a mission. She faces the island factory of Rossum’s Universal Robots, the world’s leading company in robotic engineering. She is convinced that these new creations called robots they make are deserving of rights like humans do. Everyone else is convinced robots are nothing more than tools for human use. Is it so, or is a robot rebellion becoming a more likely prospect as the robots start to seem more intelligent than first thought?
First performed in English in 1922, R.U.R. is most notable for being the play that introduced the word “robot” into the English language and one of the popular early examples of the science fiction genre onstage. (Mary Kay)

Rossum’s Universal Robots by Karel Čapek, act 2

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-pyjyu-bd773a

Helena Glory, as the daughter of a major industrial power’s president, is a woman on a mission. She faces the island factory of Rossum’s Universal Robots, the world’s leading company in robotic engineering. She is convinced that these new creations called robots they make are deserving of rights like humans do. Everyone else is convinced robots are nothing more than tools for human use. Is it so, or is a robot rebellion becoming a more likely prospect as the robots start to seem more intelligent than first thought?
First performed in English in 1922, R.U.R. is most notable for being the play that introduced the word “robot” into the English language and one of the popular early examples of the science fiction genre onstage. (Mary Kay)

Rossum’s Universal Robots by Karel Čapek, preface & act 1

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-788ws-bd772d

Recorded by Librivox

Helena Glory, as the daughter of a major industrial power’s president, is a woman on a mission. She faces the island factory of Rossum’s Universal Robots, the world’s leading company in robotic engineering. She is convinced that these new creations called robots they make are deserving of rights like humans do. Everyone else is convinced robots are nothing more than tools for human use. Is it so, or is a robot rebellion becoming a more likely prospect as the robots start to seem more intelligent than first thought?
First performed in English in 1922, R.U.R. is most notable for being the play that introduced the word “robot” into the English language and one of the popular early examples of the science fiction genre onstage. (Mary Kay)

Revolutionary Unity by Nestor Makhno

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-kmz4h-bcd225

Read the full essays here:

http://nestormakhno.info/english/revdisc.htm

http://nestormakhno.info/english/struggle.htm

http://nestormakhno.info/english/newplatform/introduction.htm

 

Nestor Makhno (1888-1934) was a Ukrainian revolutionary anarchist, military leader, and writer. He led the Revolutionary Insurrectionary Army of Ukraine during the Russian Revolution, which helped defeat the tsarist forces and establish the Ukrainian Free Territory (1917-1921). Because the anarchist project in Ukraine threatened the Bolsheviks’ monopoly on power following the Russian Revolution, Lenin and Trotsky instructed the Red Army to destroy the Free Territory and murder or imprison anarchists. Makhno went into exile, eventually settling in Paris, France. He joined the Group of Russian Anarchists Abroad and published writings about anarchism and the Russian Revolution.

These three essays are glimpses of Makhno’s theories on revolutionary praxis. Along with other members of the Group of Russian Anarchists Abroad, he developed platformism, the anarchist philosophy that says that revolutionaries should adopt unified ideologies, strategies, and tactics to ensure the success of anarchist revolutions. Makhno believed that the splintered anarchist movement ensured that anarchism of any stripe would never succeed. Instead, he proposed the Organizational Platform of the General Union of Anarchists to address the lack of unity between individual anarchists, national anarchist movements, and the international struggle against the state and capitalism. The platform suggests that anarchists must try to agree upon a united set of goals and principles to destroy the state, tactics to achieve those goals, and strategies to organize society after the state is abolished.

Advice to Comrades by Elisee Reclus

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-thths-bbd363

Full text here:https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/elisee-reclus-advice-to-my-anarchist-comrades

“In a word, commercial competition, under the paternal aegis of the law, allows the great majority of merchants-— and this fact is attested to in countless medical inquests-— adulterate provisions and drink, sell pernicious substances as wholesome food, and kill by slow poisoning… Let people say what they will, slavery, which abolitionists strove so gallantly to extirpate in America, prevails in another form in every civilized country; for entire populations, placed between the alternatives of death by starvation and toils which they detest, are constrained to choose the latter. And if we would deal frankly with the barbarous society to which we belong, we must acknowledge that murder, albeit disguised under a thousand insidious and scientific forms, still, as in the times of primitive savagery, terminates the majority of lives.”
― Élisée Reclus